Saving people, fish and Alpine snow: Our story contest winners

Saving people, fish and Alpine snow: Our story contest winners

For the 14th News Decoder Storytelling Competition, the winning stories tackled human trafficking, river conservation and climate change. In its first year of working with News Decoder, the Tatnall School in the U.S. state of Delaware took both first and second prizes...

From caviar to conservation: Saving the Atlantic sturgeon

From caviar to conservation: Saving the Atlantic sturgeon

To bring a fish back from the brink of extinction, people must push for protection over pollution. An Atlantic sturgeon. (Credit: Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control)  This article, by high school student Annette Khosravi, was produced...

Student author Annette Khosravi from ND school partner The Tatnall School delves into the world of conservation in this piece about saving the Atlantic sturgeon. Highlighting News Decoder’s mission to connect the local to the global, this text serves as an example of how local activism may lead to widespread positive impacts.

Exercise: Ask students to look into the environmental and social organizations in your local community. What types of local groups could they contribute to? What is the broader significance of civic engagement? After completing their research, students should each come up with and present a 90-second “elevator pitch” for the organization they researched, including a specific call to action for others to get involved.

Student athletes face added pressure to succeed

Student athletes face added pressure to succeed

Extracurricular activities and sports can help students gain admission to university. But is the need to ace exams and win one for the team too much pressure? Photo illustration of teen athletes against a backdrop of grades and college application. This article, by...

Youth correspondent Micah Earnest of News Decoder partner The Tatnall School gives us a glimpse into the life of a student athlete in an article that asks us to redefine “success” for young people. With mounting pressure to succeed in academics and extracurricular activities, some student athletes with college aspirations are seeing declines in mental health. What can we do to change that? 

Exercise: Have students read the article, then launch a discussion to answer the question that appears at the end of the text: “What can we do for people now and future generations to make schooling a better learning space for high schoolers who want to succeed without feeling inferior to others if they do not do a sport or reach the top 1% of their class?” You may consider using the Think-Pair-Share protocol for this discussion (i.e. Students think and jot down notes independently, discuss with one partner and finally, volunteers share ideas with the class.). 

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