News Decoder
Under assault, democracy will survive – News Decoder webinar

Under assault, democracy will survive – News Decoder webinar

In a public webinar, a leading UK youth advocate and students from News Decoder’s network discussed challenges to democracy around the world. Democracy might be in trouble around the world, but it will survive the challenges it is facing in the early 21st...

Decoder: Why a young person should not ignore the stock market

Decoder: Why a young person should not ignore the stock market

On any day, the stock market can go up or down. But in the long run, a young person cannot afford to ignore the chance to invest in company shares. The effect of compound interest, with an initial investment of $1,000 and 20% annual interest, compounded at various...

Alan Wheatley’s article on stock markets touches on concepts of tremendous long-term importance to young people, such as compounded interest and interest rates. Wheatley has decades of experience covering international finance, and it shows as he connects investing fundamentals with economic growth and the current U.S. political situation. The article finishes with questions that can be taken up in a wide range of classrooms: Who would be better for stock markets — Trump or Biden? If you have $1,000, should you spend or save it? And why is Wall Street near a record high during the coronavirus pandemic? With Wheatley explaining matters, there’s no reason why economics should be “the dismal science”!

Decoder: How does the U.S. Electoral College work?

Decoder: How does the U.S. Electoral College work?

A candidate can win the U.S. presidency without winning the most votes. Americans don’t like the Electoral College, but it seems here to stay. Senate pages carry presidential electoral ballots to a joint session of Congress, Washington, DC, 6 January 2017....

To understand our world of today, students need to know where we came from. But history in a vacuum can be a turnoff if it’s not connected to current events. Bernd Debusmann’s decoder offers a historical look at the curious institution of the U.S. Electoral College, while connecting the dots to today’s political events in that country. The article links to documents that open the door to further study and poses three questions at the end that are fodder for classroom discussion.

Tag: U.S. politics